Sarawak: Journey to Semenggoh

March 2017

Sunrise is as sudden as night. We have time for one final hike before the boat takes us away from Bako.

Path to the beach Bako Mar 2017

The bearded pigs watch us leave.

Bearded pig on beach1

Bearded pig1

Fishing huts and mangrove forests flash by as the boat speeds towards its jetty.

Fishermen huts Bako Mar 2017

Away from the river, the road runs southwards to Semenggoh, the first reserve I’ve ever visited where the authorities have apparently found it necessary to specifically ban gambling…perhaps there is a story behind that, but it’s unknown to me.

Do not gamble

Semenggoh has orang-utans. They are orphans or rescues, restored to a semi-wild existence by the patience and respect of Semenggoh’s wardens. They roam freely through the forests here, but often return to feeding platforms, especially in seasons when fewer wild trees are fruiting.

Needless to say, everyone gathered under a small shelter listening to one of Semenggoh’s wardens give a safety briefing is hoping to glimpse an orang-utan. But they come at times of their own choosing, and there many smaller treasures here to observe too.

Longhorn spiders dazzle in the bushes.

Longhorn spider Mar 2017

And this – hopefully the novelty value can excuse the photo quality, for the little grey-brown animal on the left is a treeshrew, the first one I’ve ever glimpsed. They have a higher brain-to-body ratio than any other mammal. It is accompanied by a cream-coloured giant squirrel.

Tree shrew and giant squirrel

It may not have much cream in its fur, but ‘giant’ does fit; it is about 80cm long, including its tail.

Giant squirrel 26 Mar 2017

They might be considered a supporting cast by some, but the shaking of the trees suggests that the stars are not far behind.

4 thoughts on “Sarawak: Journey to Semenggoh

    1. Yes, even a Scottish wildcat might decline that one! I got bitten by a grey squirrel once while rescuing it and it truly, seriously, hurt. I cannot imagine what it feels like to be nipped by a giant squirrel.

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    1. I dread to imagine what one of those squirrels would do to a birdfeeder!

      Yes, there’s an interesting variety of wild pig species in south-east Asia, many of which are barely known out the region.

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