Romania: Richis Storms

June – August 2016

We were setting up hedgehog tracking tunnels on the woodland edge when the sky lost its light and the land turned emerald.

Storm coming RI 250616

Camera: off.

Survey: off.

We run, but the rain runs faster, and throws itself into hair and eyes with an almost human malice. I toss my beloved metal hiking pole into a bush because lightning couldn’t find a better conductor.

Somehow we reach the road, where the cows are waiting for evening milking and a foal grazes idly alongside his parents. The thunder and lightning are almost simultaneous. My boots have withstood the puddles but the insides are afloat. Camp is also awash, with students diving into puddles.

Morning brings sunshine – and bears, or at least their footprints, admired as we rescue my poor hiking stick. Richis is altogether rich in mammal sign. Roe deer, not least; unusually for deer, they scrape away leaves to create a sleeping space, leaving a bare patch about 60cm wide.

Roe deer bedding area

It is the roe deer’s rutting season, and at night their barks sound even over the endless yapping of village dogs. The early morning teams often spot them but most of my sightings are through the army of camera traps that I’ve deployed in these woods.

Snapshot_7

Snapshot_7c

The cameras are also starting to catch some exciting carnivores. Pine martens are the larger of the two marten species that endlessly bounce, leap and climb through Transylvania.

Snapshot_7a

Amazingly, the same camera caught an edible dormouse! This is found in Britain too – it was introduced to Cheshire decades ago. It is a much larger species than the hazel dormice that I study in Surrey.

Snapshot_7b

Meanwhile, hawk-moths dazzle in camp.

Richis post7

Leaving Richis is difficult. But six more villages await.

4 thoughts on “Romania: Richis Storms

  1. How interesting that your first sentence and picture capture the fact that a rainstorm filters the light wavelengths so as to leave the greens, so that anything green glows, almost like a fluorescent tube. I have observed it many times.

    I love the sweep of your observations in these posts … you get my mind swooping and leaping from one thing to another.

    Like

    1. Thanks DW. This expedition is challenging to blog because every day was full of so many adventures. I kept a diary, but if I’d blogged it in real time, it would have taken eight weeks!

      I love the glow of the land before a rainstorm. It is beautiful in the prairies too.

      Like

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