Canada: Frenchman

This little river is the prairie to me. Winding ribbon of grey-green water – it is quiet now. Read the land and learn a different story: the mud is churned because bison thundered through.

Frenchman1

Like everything in the prairies, the Frenchman pretends to be subtle when it is not. This small vein is the remnant of a monstrous torrent, one of many prairie rivers fed and bloated by the dying Laurentide icesheet – the icecap that covered most of Canada. Today, the ice has gone and the river has shrunk, little channel in a giant valley carved by its riotous past.

But it remains a wild, surprising place, sweetened by the wind and half-burying its secrets. Never underestimate the drama of the Frenchman River. I spent eight extraordinary weeks here in 2012, running its first ever trail camera project. And to be sure, this is the land of powerful things.

Trail camera photo

Bison crossing river

Bison have a history too. While I was completing my fieldwork, the river uncovered the bones of what was probably a Bison antiquusa 10,000 year old predecessor of the modern plains bison. And of course, as everyone knows, the plains bison itself nearly vanished in our era, but Grasslands National Park has brought them back.

And now I’m back too, watching them breathe under that sprawling, fitful sky.

Bison 21 Sept 2018

I’m looking for old friends, remembering old turns in the road.

Coyote

Coyote GNP Sept 18

Plains garter

Garter snake GNP 21 Sept 2018

And listening to prairie dogs yip.

Prairie dog1

Grasslands National Park is the only place in Canada where these hyper-social ground squirrels still survive. They are a symbol of prairie holding itself together, of an ecosystem relatively intact. Everything here knows the dogs: some species hunt them, some live in their burrows, some simply benefit from their cropped-grass grazing regime.

I’ve been absent six years. It’s not much in the lifespan of a place like this.

4 thoughts on “Canada: Frenchman

  1. Adele, Ah, the mighty Frenchman! One of the few places on the flatland that I haven’t been too! Owing mostly to it’s isolation! I would surely like to do a walk about there, and to see the wild Bison! Excellent post and excellent images!

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  2. If for nothing else, seeing wild bison would be a good reason to go to prairies. Over here in BC they are farming them, on Vancouver Island of all places. But that’s not the same.

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    1. Indeed, an animal can only be understood in its context. Grasslands NP makes it easier to imagine what the prairies must have been like when millions of these amazing animals thundered across the rivers. The bison herds supported vast numbers of wolves too, far more than any other habitat, according to some evidence. The occasional wolf still shows up in southern Saskatchewan but sadly society is not ready to tolerate them yet.

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